2020 Virtual Summit Schedule

 

Thursday, June 4

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Frances Moore Lappé, Author, Diet for a Small Planet
3:00-3:45 PM Bill McKibben, Founder, 350.org There are no silver linings to a pandemic, but if we’re going to go through this kind of trauma we might as well learn some things–here’s my sense of what we should be thinking about as we come out of quarantine. Reality is real, since we’ve delayed so long speed now matters, and solidarity is most important of all.

 

 

Friday, June 5

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Tom Newmark, New Chapter, The Carbon Underground, Finca Luna Nueva Lodge Climate change, soil health, food security, and…pandemics?  Is there a connection, and even more importantly is there a possibility that restoring biodiversity with regenerative agriculture might help reduce the threat of future disease outbreaks?  Tom will explore these topics, along with discussing the evolution of the modern regenerative agricultural movement.
3:00-4:30 PM Sandra Steingraber  Fracking, Public Health, Climate
5:00-6:30

Happy Hour 

Informal mingling for attendees 

 

 

Monday, June 8

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Panel: Social Justice & Climate Change

Food justice asks the questions: where does injustice live in our food system and what would a just food system look like? Climate justice asks the questions: who is responsible for climate change and who will bear the brunt of the effects of climate change? Food and climate justice bring our attention to ways in which we can work to create more equity and fairness for those left on the fringes of the local food movement. In this panel, we will share three approaches to food justice and how they create more resilience in the face of climate instability.

Tatiana Abatemarco will speak about the community engaged food studies program at Bennington College, which has a goal of addressing food insecurity in Bennington County. Madeline Sharrow of Migrant Justice will share their work to ensure human rights for migrant workers on Vermont farms. Conor Floyd of Food Connects will share their work with Food Connects to create a Farm to School program to increase fresh food access and food education to children in Windham County. Together, they will consider their vision of a food and climate just future where everyone has food access and human rights.

Tatiana Abatemarco, Conor Floyd, Madeline Sharrow
 3:00-4:30 PM Ben & Jerry’s 

Ben & Jerry’s has an ambitious plan to reduce its carbon footprint that follows the guidance of global experts and includes Science Based Targets along with social and economic justice components. Rob Michalak, Ben & Jerry’s Social Mission Special Projects Director, shares the company’s path and plan. Rob Malachik

Rob Malachik

 

Tuesday, June 9

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Panel: Financing Farming

How can different financial models help fund farming. Co-op models and Regenerative Farming?

Julie Snorek, Nico Lustig, Nic Cook, Jesse McDougall
3:00-4:30 PM Panel: Agricultural Policy in a Time of Uncertainty

What does the future of feeding ourselves look like when faced with pressing issues of climate change and a global pandemic? A small group of farmers, activists, and advocates come together to discuss just that. While the global food supply has become increasingly consolidated, productive, and wasteful, its destruction of ecological, social, and economic systems has also increased. What is being done, advocated for, and advanced in this time of such local to global uncertainty and how can we ensure environmental and social stewardship when supporting our future subsistence when advocating and enacting policies.

 Lt. Gov David Zuckerman, Theresa Snow, Caroline Gordon, Lindsey Berk

 

 

Wednesday, June 10

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Panel: Cooperative Ownership with Real Pickles & Vermont Employee Ownership Center

The cooperative model has long been recognized for its resilience in challenging times. Crises have historically spurred waves of cooperative entrepreneurship, as people come together to meet their shared needs in a democratic and equitable way. In this session, attendees will learn about how different kinds of co-ops are weathering and responding to the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis, as well as how they are engaging with the work required to increase the resilience of their organizations and communities in facing the Climate Crisis. Moderated by Matt Cropp of the Vermont Employee Ownership Center, panelists include Addie Rose Holland of the Real Pickles worker co-op, Bonnie Hudspeth of the Neighboring Food Co-op Association, and Robert Miller of VSECU.

Addie Rose Holland, Matt Cropp, Bonnie Hudspeth, and Robert Miller   
3:00-4:30 PM TBA

 

 

Thursday, June 11

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM Pete & Gerry’s Organic Eggs  Green Tea, Pete and Gerry’s Green initiative. Clean up day video and photos!
3:00-4:30 PM Join Karen Washington for a virtual farm tour and talk!

Rise and Root Farm strongly rooted in New York City and committed to engaging rural and urban communities through food and farming. Our current and previous farming related affiliations include: Just Food, Farm School NYC, Ecostation:NY, Bushwick Campus Farm, Black Urban Growers, Crock and Jar, La Familia Verde Community Garden coalition, GrowNYC. We have worked with community gardens and urban farms in NYC and beyond, and we have dedicated our lives to increasing the number of people growing and eating good food. We care about justice and equity and in building a strong local food economy. We came together with a common dream, to continue our food justice work by growing food and community beyond the city boundaries. We believe we can accomplish more together than any one of us could do on our own.

Karen Washington

 

5:00-6:30

Happy Hour

 

 

Friday, June 12

 

 

Time

Session

Details

1:00-2:30 PM How We Move on This Earth & Why That Matters

Join in an exploration into how our mobility choices influence our human perceptions and worldviews and ultimately our communities and our environment. Taking a deep dive into the dynamics of our bodies and our essential human capacities to sense and interact with the ecological and social places we inhabit, we’ll explore the often overlooked magic of what happens when we are in the act of transportation and the ways that we ourselves are potentially transformed by it.

Additionally, we’ll consider how the automobile has subverted a multitude of our embodied human connections to the world and has perhaps radically undermined our ability to authentically respond to climate change. Calling on material from legends, literature, cinema, neuropsychology, philosophy and other sources, we’ll attempt to uncover a general theory of what it means for us to move on this Earth. We’ll also consider practices we might bring forward into our daily lives and our communities to bring a a greater sense of depth and meaning to our everyday mobility.

Dave Cohen
3:00-4:30 PM Nature’s Design Principles for Regenerative Systems

Climate change, locust plagues in Africa, emerging novel viruses such as Covid-19, widespread environmental degradation, planetary boundaries (e.g., Rockström et al. 2009; Steffen et al. 2015): there are all symptoms of the true underlying problem — our flawed relationship with the natural environment. But we only have to turn to the natural environment to see the solutions. Even as we recognize human well-being and our social and economic systems depend entirely on natural systems, we continue to experience unprecedented environmental challenges largely as a consequence of unsustainable interactions with nature. “Sustainability” has entered our lexicon, but the word itself does not specify sustainability of what and for whom over what time period? In this talk, I argue that sustainability has little meaning in and of itself and that regenerative solutions that follow design principles emerging from natural systems are by definition indefinitely sustainable. I use the design principles that we followed in planting our permaculture orchard to highlight these issues. Extractive capitalism and large-scale, commodity-based, resource- and energy-intensive farming are not regenerative and consequently lead to adverse outcomes. Nature’s design principles provide a blueprint for regenerative economic and social systems embedded within the biosphere.

 Dr. Katherine von Stackelberg