2015 Summit Schedule

All plenaries are held in Brattleboro’s historic Greco-Deco Latchis Theatre at the foot of Main Street.

You’ll find our registration/information desk there as well, along with the Everyone’s Books book table featuring works by Summit speakers, staffed during most Summit hours.

 

Wednesday, June 3

Time

Session

Details

2:00 – 5:00 PM GATHERING — Latchis Lobby Registration desk open in Latchis Theatre Lobby
2:00 – 5:00 PM Build our Peace Labyrinth Plaza Park, across from Latchis Theatre. Help co-create the Peace Labyrinth in Plaza Park. Facilitated by Ingrid Bredenberg
5:00-6:10 PM NETWORKING RECEPTION — Latchis Main Theatre

 

 

6:15-6:20 PM Welcoming remarks — Latchis Main Theatre Orly Munzing, Strolling of the Heifers founder and executive director.
6:20-6:30 PM What’s this all about? An introduction to the Summit’s themes — Latchis Main Theatre Shanta L. Evans-Crowley, Summit Coordinator
6:30-8:30 PM KEYNOTE PLENARY: Turning the Tide: Healthy food for all? — Latchis Main Theatre Alisa Gravitz, CEO, Green America; with artistic partner Susan Rosano, mosaic artist and muralist
8:45 PM – 10:00 PM OPEN MIC STORYTELLING: What’s Eating You? Funny and Entertaining Musings About Foodat the River Garden 

What's this about?

Join us for an evening of hilarity! As we invite Summiteers to think all of the challenges we face around our food-related choices, we want to bring some ease to all of our food quandaries! We invite you to share your funniest and/or most entertaining moments regarding all things food.
DETAILS HERE! Share your stories about food: everyday food choices, food quandaries, food mysteries, tall food tales, food philosophy, food science and food fables. Fun, entertaining, but still, we think, informative. Contact Shanta to sign up!
8:30 PM EVENING ACTIVITIES: Networking at local pubs, informal open-space sessions, dinner options at local restaurants

 

Thursday, June 4

Time

Session

Details

7:45-8:25 AM GATHERING — Latchis Theatre Lobby Registration, continental breakfast 
8:30-10 AM PLENARY 2: NOURISHMENT — Food for Mind, Body and Soul Latchis Main Theatre

Session details

What’s on your mind when you eat is as important as what’s on your plate. In this program, through guided imagery and a broad discussion with the audience, Dr. Finkelstein aims to develop a broader understanding of nourishment, including the three types of hunger (physical, emotional, spiritual), and the need to feed each of them. Neglecting neglecting any one of them creates the cravings that lead to behavior that pulls us away from fullness and wholeness. In this program we will experience the effect of enhancing nutrients with mindfulness and by expanding our awareness and breaking down the process we will experience the assimilation of food nutrients in the context of an integrated body-mind and soul —the wisdom of Slow Medicine, which we so desperately need.
Dr. Michael Finkelstein — The Slow Medicine Doctor — with artistic partner Sukishamanic art practitioner
10 – 10:25 AM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby — Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

10:30 AM – NOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS
FOOD, HANDS ON: Cooking demos at the River Garden Leda Scheintaub, cookbook author and co-owner of Dosa Kitchen food truck; Keith Arnold, Owner, & Sutat Anthachai, Sous Chef, Duo Restaurant
FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP:  You’ve got the big idea — now what? — Marlboro Room 2C

Session details

You are inspired and now you want to implement the new idea that’s got you fired up! Whether it is setting up a farm stand, store front, food product, establishing a partnership, how do you actually fund it? What are some steps that you need to keep in mind in order to move forward to implement your idea? This panel will explore some practical steps in moving from idea to implementation especially in regards to funding your food venture.
Panelists: Thomas Moffitt, Commonwealth Dairy: Andreas Schneider, Director of Farm Production Enterprises at Hawthorne Valley in Ghent, New York; Louisa Conrad, co-owner, Big Picture Farm, Townshend, Vermont; moderated by Emily Ryan, independent educator and facilitator
FOOD SYSTEMS: How Changing the Way We Grow Food Can Restore Ecosystems and Reverse Global Warming — Marlboro Room 2B

Session Details

So many of our large global problems–climate change, biodiversity loss, desertification, flooding and drought — can at least partly be attributed to agriculture. However, restorative farming and grazing practices and can reverse the process to the point that even severely degraded landscapes and watersheds will rebound. Let’s see how people are making this happen, and how to bring the goal of restoration into our food system.
Judith D. Schwartz, Author; and Seth Itzkan, Planet-Tech Associates
 
NOURISHMENT & WELLNESS: The Happiness Walk: Happiness is Soul Food — Marlboro Room 2D

Session details

Join Linda Wheatley and Paula Francis as they share stories and experiences from their 1300+ mile trek (with a plan to do 6500 more).  Linda and Paula will discuss the elements of how our nourishment for our beings and souls connects with and ventures beyond food.  The Happiness Walk is a project of Gross National Happiness USA, a non-profit organization that I (co-)founded in 2012 to “measure what matters.” The Walk is “two women, with walking shoes and audio recorders, crossing a big country, reporting on happiness and well-being.”
Linda Wheatley and Paula Franciswith artist partner, dancer Cyndal Ellis of SoBo Studio.
FOOD JUSTICE AND ACCESS: Is Good Food for All? — Marlboro Room 2E

Session details

Amidst the discussion about access to fresh food, is the fresh, local option an avenue available to everyone or just for the few? Join our panelists as we explore the challenging and sometimes difficult questions and realities around access to good food especially within the context of race and/or socio-economic status.  
Bonnie Hudspeth, Neighboring Food Co-ops Association; Derrick Lambert, Hunger Free Vermont; Richard Berkfield, Food Connects; Sara Trunzo, Maine Farmland Trust; moderated by Marilyn AronoffSociologist Emeritus, Michigan State University
FOOD POLICY: Can We Talk? Shouldn’t we be discussing a food system revolution? — Marlboro Glassroom, first floor

Session details

At a system level, we really need to address what is truly sustainable. Farmers don’t earn a proper living. Farm workers need a fair and just system. The soil and water need saving. Animals need humane conditions. If we honestly look at what we have right now, it doesn’t look so good. Do we have the courage to convene an honest discussion with all of the stakeholders to make the changes necessary at a policy and systems level to create the food system we need that will sustain us in the future? Rob Michalak, from Ben & Jerry’s sets the table for a frank discussion of what needs to be on the menu.

Rob Michalak, Ben & Jerry’s
A SLOW CONVERSATION: Slow it down — Latchis Main Theatre

”Session

Orly Munzing and Linda McInerney engage in a conversation about what spurred the Slow Living Summit and how the movement has affected their lives. They explore Slow Living through the senses to engage the audience in their own experience of what it feels like to slow it down.
 
Orly Munzing, founder of Strolling of the Heifers; Linda McInerney, founder and artistic director of Old Deerfield Productions; with artistic collaborator Terry Jenoure, singer and violinist, poet, multi-media artist and teacher.
FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Good Business Plans Make Good Businesses — Marlboro Ledges, first floor 

Session Details

Today, many entrepreneurs utilize crowd-funding sites like Kickstarter to launch businesses. Despite a number of crowd-funded success stories, this method focuses on the virtual community rather than the local community, which is often essential to get an enterprise off the ground. This session focuses on the importance of using community resources to build an affordable manufacturing facility, attract the highest quality staff, and source raw materials locally. My company, Against the Grain Gourmet is used as a case study. Against The Grain began during Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation’s annual Business Plan Competition. Given the opportunity to create a business we wanted to run, we built livable wages and attractive benefits into our business plan and priced our products accordingly. We also built lasting relationships with local farmers from whom we still source 14,000 dozen fresh eggs and 1500 gallons of milk a week. Our model also emphasized organic growth through investing any profits in the business. Today we employ 70 people whose starting salaries are nearly twice the minimum wage. We pay full medical benefits, 22 paid days off, profit sharing, and offer a matching 401(K) plan. Against The Grain has been successful because of its products and because of a favorable market. It has also been successful because of the quality staff we have attracted and the foresight of Brattleboro’s business community. We’ve gone “against the grain” from the beginning, and I believe companies like ours are the future of Vermont and other areas struggling to attract and retain dynamic businesses.
Nancy Cain, co-owner of Against The Grain Gourmet
NOON – 1:35 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH — Join fellow Summiteers at one the fine nearby eateries in downtown Brattleboro! 

At the Latchis: Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

1:45 – 3:15 PM PLENARY 3: FOOD SYSTEMS — Land,Legacy, and Leadership: A food entrepreneur’s journey — Latchis Main Theatre

Session details

Entrepreneur and cheesemaker Allison Hooper present twelve “lessons learned“ in thirty years of business, along with some reflections on why it all matters. Hooper was one of the first artisan cheesemakers in the United States. Hooper and her business partner Bob Reese co-founded Vermont Butter & Cheese Company in 1984 and started bringing the everyday cheese and dairy delicacies of France to the American table.
Allison Hooper, Vermont Creamery
3:15 – 3:40 PM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby — Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

3:45 – 5:15 PM BREAKOUT SESSIONS
POST-PLENARY Q&A SESSION — Latchis Main Theatre  Allison Hooper, Vermont Creamery
FOOD JUSTICE & ACCESS: Migrant Workers, the Invisible Population: Our Bridge to Good Food — Marlboro Room 2E

”Session

“Between 1 and 3 million migrant farm workers leave their homes every year to plant, cultivate, harvest, and pack fruits, vegetables and nuts in the U.S. Although invisible to most people, the presence of migrant farm workers in many rural communities throughout the nation is undeniable, since hand labor is still necessary for the production of the blemish-free fruits and vegetables that consumers demand.” (Migrant Farm Workers: Our Nation’s Invisible Population, Eduardo González, Jr.,) Sometimes, the most forgotten group within the food justice conversations are the individuals who are enduring low pay and a range of other living conditions in order to daily meet the needs of consumers demanding good, local food. What are some of the ethical tensions within this scenario between the migrant worker and the consumer? How doe we close the gap between the food we want access to and the moral price we may be paying to obtain it?
 
Howard Prussack, organic farmer; Sara Stowell, Vermont Migrant Education Center; Enrique Balcazar Migrant Justice; moderated by Rachel Greenberger, Director, Food Sol at Babson College
FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP: The Emergent Agriculture: A new paradigm for the sustainable future of food — Marlboro Main Conference Room, first floor  

Session Details

Our food system, like many other aspects of our life support system is in serious disrepair. A new paradigm of food production, based on practices consistent with the fundamental principles of ecology is gaining traction and offers a viable alternative to the dominant industrial food production system. A new generation of farmers, artisans, scholars and consumers is leading the way toward a sustainable agriculture capable of producing food and fiber without damaging ecosystems, and celebrating the connections between wild nature and the agricultural landscape. Personal experience in the research laboratory and university classroom, on the farm and at farmers markets provides compelling evidence of the emergence of a new, sustainable food system in America.
Dr. Gary Kleppel, Professor, Department of Biology, State University of New York at Albany; Co-Owner/Operator, Longfield Farm, Altamont, NY
FOOD POLICY: Food Marketing and How it Affects Us — Marlboro Common Area, first floor  

Session details

In this session we will explore the what, where, how and why of unhealthy food and beverage marketing to kids. What is food marketing? Where is food being marketed? How is food being marketed? Why should we care about marketing to kids? Finally, we will discuss what we can do to reduce unhealthy food and beverage marketing to children in our communities. Background.
Carol Hazen, Director of Advocacy Resources, Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity
FOOD SYSTEMS: The Story of Bread: Flour — farm-to-table’s forgotten food — Marlboro Ledges, first floor

Session details

Zach and Daniella of will tell the story of how they came to start Green Mountain Flour and what they are learning about re-localizing flour in a global food system.
Zachary Stremlau and Daniella Malin, Green Mountain Flour
NOURISHMENT & WELLNESS: Redefining Healthy Food for the Health Care Sector: Healthy food in health care — Marlboro Room 2C

”Session

With all of the talk about healthy food it is sometimes easy to forget about how these conversations apply within the health and wellness sector. Please join a range of experts as they share their thoughts and raise some questions about how the health are sector is raising the profile of what it means to nourish the body and maintain wellness as it is connected to healthcare.
 
Skye Cornell, Wholesome Wave, Jamie Baribeau, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, Stacia Clinton, Healthy Food in Health Care; moderated by Jerelyn Wilson, Building Green
NOURISHMENT & WELLNESS: From Farm to School: Bringing fresh food into the schools — Marlboro Room 2B

Session details

What steps can we take to educate our youth about food so that they can make informed choices as adults? We can not expect change to come about if we are not properly engaging our youth about food though education and the proper introduction to fresh food. This panel will explore some ways that Connecticut and Vermont are introducing youth to fresh food through various education models.
Drew Gradinger, Kindle Farm School; Timothy Cipriano, Hooray Purée; Katherine Jandernoa, Food Connects; moderated by Julie Lineberger, Owner, LineSync Architecture
FOOD SYSTEMS: Art, Food & Farming: Get inspired to strengthen these connections in your community — Marlboro Glassroom, first floor

”Session

The curator of the Maine Farmland Trust Gallery — a bonafide art gallery within a statewide land trust — brings four Maine artists and unlimited creativity to inspire you to think about the many possible intersections of local art, local farming and local food. This session will include an artist panel, visual presentations, poetry readings and participatory workshop elements to get you creatively involved.
 
Process-oriented, conceptual artist Heather Lyon; farmer/artist Jacinda Martinez; shamanic art practition er Sukiand farming partners and poets Toussaint St. Negritude and Josh Kauppila, poet/farmer/organizer; moderated by Anna Witholt Abaldo, Maine Farmland Trust
FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP: From the Kitchen Table to a National Distributed Business — Marlboro Room 2D

Session details

How does a local food business expand into the regional, national and sometimes global sphere? There are a number of considerations as a potential and current food entrepreneurs and how/where/when to distribute is one of those big questions. What are some challenges in expanding your business or in considering your distribution channels? This panel shares the stories and insights from food entrepreneurs as they discuss everything from some of their successes to some of the challenges of using fresh local products in their distribution.
 
Nancy Cain, Against the Grain Gourmet; Richard French, The Works Bakery Café; Andreas Schneider, Hawthorne Valley; moderated by Margaret Christie, CISA (Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture)
5:30 until it’s over!

NETWORKING RECEPTION at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, featuring:

  • The opening of our Farm Art show
    • Music and dancing — featured artists: Summit plenary speaker LAURA LENGNICK on fiddle; Brattleboro pianist extraordinaire FRANZ ROBERT; accoustic guitarist SARAH WALLIS
EVENING ACTIVITIES: networking at local pubs, informal open-space sessions, dinner options at local restaurants

 

Friday, June 5

Time

Session

Details

7:45-8:25 AM

GATHERING

Registration, continental breakfast in the Latchis Theatre Lobby — Book table open
8:30-10 AM PLENARY 4: FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP — Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating
Food Systems for a Changing Climate
— Latchis Main Theatre

Session Details

As we enter the 21st century, farm and food businesses face novel challenges associated with resource scarcity and climate change. In this session, author Laura Lengnick shares the adaptation stories of 25 award-winning sustainable farmers and ranchers featured in her new book, Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating Food Systems For a Changing Climate.  These producers, many of them 3 or 4th generation farmers and ranchers, have managed sustainable businesses producing vegetables, fruits and nuts, grains and livestock products in the same location for at least 25 years. Many, but not all, have experienced increased challenges associated with more variable weather and more frequent and intense weather extremes over the last decade. They explain how they reduce climate risks and increase resilience of their businesses through management practices that improve soil quality and increase biodiversity on their farms and ranches, and capture retail value for their products.
Laura Lengnick, Local Food Research Center, Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project, Asheville, NC; with artistic partner, painter Deborah Lazar
10:00 – 10:25 AM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby

10:30 AM – NOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS
POST-PLENARY Q&A SESSION — Latchis Main Theatre Laura Lengnick, Local Food Research Center, Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project, Asheville, NC
FOOD, HANDS ON: Cooking demos at the River Garden Nancy Cain, Against the Grain Gourmet; and Dar Tavernier-Singer, Tavernier Chocolates
FOOD JUSTICE & ACCESS: Access in Action: Illustrations of how communities are making food accessible to all — Marlboro Room 2D

Session details

How do we create edible ecosystems?  What are some ways of connecting the message of local healthy food to cultural diversity?  In this panel, the speakers will share various models that are being used throughout the New England region and topics presented will include:
  • A discussion on how aquaculture and aquaponics are being implemented in one community to ensure access to food;
  • How one community has developed and implemented a community cookbook that is connected to the cultural diversity of the community;
  • The creation of edible ecosystems as a solution to food access;
  • And more!

 
Keith Wilda, Executive Director, Island Grown Initiative; Nicole Berube, CitySeed; Cimbria Badenhausen, ecosystem advocate, ecological design consultant and teacher; Anore Horton, Hunger Free Vermont; Michelle Wallace, Program Director at the Vermont Foodbank; moderated by Julie Lineberger, owner, Linesync Architecture
FOOD ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Hard Core Entrepreneurship: What you need to know to start, scale and challenge the status quo with your food business — Marlboro Glassroom, first floor

Session details

Hear how one small operation grew their business through partnerships with other farms and creating a sassy, memorable brand that stands for something. See how these basic concepts can apply to your endeavor. Also, this discussion will include information about telling your farm’s story and leveraging it both on social and traditional mediums to build a brand.
Jason Amundsen, and Lucie Amundsenco-owners, The Locally Laid Egg Company
  FOOD SYSTEMS: Seed Libraries and Other Seed Share Initiatives — Marlboro Room 2C 

Session details

Seed saving and sharing programs might involve public libraries, but not necessarily. Learn about promoting seed sharing initiatives in your community through seed libraries, seed swaps, and seed gardens.
Cindy Conner, author
NOURISHMENT & WELLNESS: The The Yin and Yang of Climate
Crisis: Healing personal, cultural and ecological imbalance with Chinese medicine 
— Marlboro Room 2E

Details

What is happening in the climate is a mirror of what is happening with us and within our culture. Using the insights of Chinese medicine, we’ll discuss the bigger and deeper causes of the our warming planet. We’ll also use an eastern perspective to see the patterns in the enormous amounts of climate data. More about the new book: The Yin and Yang of Climate Crisis blends the external focus of environmentalism (e.g., western science, policy issues, regulations) with the internal focus of Chinese medicine (e.g., personal health, balancing Qi, diet). Climate change and its literal realities—melting ice caps, dying forests, floods like those recently in Vermont—can be understood as a symptom of deeper issues, both within us as individuals and within our country and culture.
Brendan Kelly, Acupuncturist and herbalist at Jade Mountain Wellness, author, teacher
FOOD JUSTICE: Bunker Farm: Preserving a farm with community connections Marlboro Ledges, first floor 

Details

Joan Weir, of the Vermont Land Trust, and Noah Hoskins, of The Bunker Farm, will present on land access issues facing start up farmers in Vermont. This presentation will cover the Vermont Land Trust Farmland Access Program, and the experience of The Bunker Farm, a new farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We will cover the details of the farm transaction, community involvement and fundraising, and how making agricultural land accessible to a new generation of entrepreneurial Vermont farmers is critical for the local food economy.
Noah Hoskins-ForsytheBunker Farm; and Joan WeirVermont Land Trust
  FOOD POLICY: The Local is Global — Marlboro Room 2B

Session details

This panel explores ood policy from the local, state, federal and international perspective.  Our panelists will cover what the landscape is in Connecticut, Vermont, New England, and other national and international trends as it relates to food policy.  At the end of the session, attendees will receive suggestions on tangible actions for what they can do in their communities, to their state legislature or their Congressional reps and senators.
Panelists: Martha C. Page, Hartford Food System, Colin O’Neill, Center for Food Safety, and Andrea Stander, Rural Vermont; moderated by Maddie Monty, Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont
NOON – 1:35 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH — Join fellow Summiteers at one the fine nearby eateries in downtown Brattleboro! 

At the Latchis: Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

1:45-3:00 PM BREAKOUT SESSIONS
FOOD SYSTEMS: Building a Better System: A slow food approach to a good food job — Marlboro Glassroom, first floor

Session details

We know that our food system needs work, but what about our job culture? We’ll explore how and why the system of how we obtain and maintain jobs is flawed, and how we can make more sustainable efforts to create a meaningful livelihood.
Taylor Cocalis, Good Food Jobs; John Steven Bianucci, Iroquois Valley Farms, LLC; moderated by Alex Risley Schroeder, Finding Earth Works
FOOD, HANDS ON: Cooking demos at the River Garden Abigail Gehring and  Tim Lawrence, authors of The Healthy Gluten Free Diet and Classic Candy; Ismail Samad, chef, The Gleanery, Putney VT
NOURISHMENT & WELLNESS — Q&A followup to the Thursday morning plenary — Latchis Main Theatre Dr. Michael Finkelstein, The Slow Medicine Doctor
FOOD SYSTEMS: Resilient Food Systems — Marlboro Room 2C

”Session

As California, the nation’s leading agricultural producer, struggles with a fourth year of drought, availability of certain crops may become limited and prices will almost certainly rise. While this will be a hardship for some, California’s water woes also creates opportunity for more locally based, resilient food systems to emerge in the Northeast and elsewhere. Resilient food systems are less vulnerable to water shortages, less dependent of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, and better able to provide local food. This session will address what is meant by “resilient food systems” and outline some of the ways in which more localized, sustainable agricultural production is creating new enterprise, helping to protect agricultural land, and revolutionizing our food systems.
 
Keith Wilda, Island Grown Inititiative, Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension; moderated by Alex Wilson, Resilient Design Institute
NOURISHMENT AND WELLNESS: Food as Medicine or An Herbalist’s Approach to Food — Marlboro Room 2B

Session Details

This panel will will explore shifting and broadening our concepts of food from simply fuel or physical nourishment to real medicine for our bodies, minds and spirits. We can bring mindfulness to what our bodies consume, mindfulness of what our minds consume, and mindfulness of how our consumption affects our planet. How can our relationship with the plants and animals we consume become part of healing our selves and our world?
 
Betzy Bancroft, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism; Celeste Longacre, gardener, author of Celeste’s Garden Delights; moderated by Cheryl Wilfong, author, The Meditative Gardener
3:00 – 3:20 PM

BREAK

Regather at the Latchis Main Theatre — In the lobby: Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

3:25-5:30 PM CLOSING PLENARY: FOOD JUSTICE & ACCESS: Fresh, Healthy Food For Your Community: The big and small things you can do  — Latchis Main Theatre

Session details

Look around you…who is included in your local / regional food systems and who isn’t? Why? At the Slow Living Summit we’ve heard from boots-on-the-ground experts in their fields. Now’s the time to reflect and ask ourselves – what can each one of us do to help create access to fresh, healthy, whole foods for everyone? Start a green grocery in a food desert, a farmers’ market at a rest stop, work to subsidize whole foods, build an inter-generational garden, a humane slaughterhouse…and more. You can change the world. Join the Food Access & Justice summary in hope, inspiration and most importantly, in action.
Vicki Robin, co-author of the perennial best seller, Your Money or Your Life, and author of the new book, Blessing the Hands that Feed Us; and Ali Berlow, author, founder of Island Grown Initiative; with artistic partner, interdisciplinary artist Maya ApfelbaumJo Kirsch, Village Yoga, Manchester VT; and Percussionist & Gong Master Stephan Brandstatter
5:30 PM-8:30 PM Gallery Walk and Strolling of the Heifers Street Festival, Main Street & Downtown Brattleboro

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 6:

SUNDAY, JUNE 7:

  • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.: Farmers Breakfast, The Marina Restaurant, Putney Road
  • 8 a.m through the day: Tour de Heifer 15, 30 and 60-mile farm-to-farm, dirt-road cycling rides, beginning and ending at Lilac Ridge Farm,West Brattleboro
  • 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.: Farm Toursself-guided exploration of five unique and varied farms in the region