2014 Summit Schedule

Registration    |    Speaker/Artist Bios    |    Who Was There?

All plenaries are held in Brattleboro’s historic Greco-Deco Latchis Theatre at the foot of Main Street; you’ll find out registration/information desk there as well, staffed during most Summit hours.

The Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, which is directly across the intersection from the Latchis, is offering free admission to all Summiteers and invites you to stop in — just show your Summit badge!

Wednesday, June 4

Time

Session

Details

2:00 – 5:00 PM GATHERING — Latchis Lobby Registration desk open in Latchis Theatre Lobby
2:00 – 5:00 PM Build our Peace Labyrinth Plaza Park, across from Latchis Theatre. Help co-create the Peace Labyrinth in Plaza Park. Facilitated by Ingrid Bredenberg
5:00 – 6:10 PM

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Latchis Main Theatre

Heavy hors d’oeuvres; mixed drinks compliments of Crop Organic Vodka and Farmers Organic Gin

 

6:15-6:20 PM Welcoming remarks — Latchis Main Theatre Orly Munzing, Strolling of the Heifers founder and executive director.
6:20-6:50 PM What’s this all about? A tone-setting introduction to the Summit’s themes and its unique, collaborative structure combining thought leaders and artists — Latchis Main Theatre Linda McInerney, the Summit’s artistic director and Erica Wheeler, ‘sense of place’ artist, singer/songwriter, speaker, educator and conservation advocate
6:50-8:30 PM OPENING PLENARY: The Well Being: Health, Healing and Community Lifestyle Medicine has three pillars —creating a triad: Nutrition, Activity and Stress Management. Together, they share in the support of the individual. Dr. Eagle will discuss achieving one’s highest potential of health and happiness in a sustainable lifestyle, resulting in The Well Being. When people think about our current medical system, it’s easy to envision a sterile-appearing clinical setting and a prescription pad. However, this model often addresses only symptoms, generating a recurring cycle of patient health issues. Dr. Eagle advocates a “sustainable healthcare movement” for preventing and reversing chronic conditions. Instead of the fast-food mentality—take this pill for that—she will discuss incorporating a new approach that involves the application of evidence-based environmental, social, psychological and behavioral science to balance the Mind/Body/Spirit. — Latchis Main Theatre Samantha Eagle, founder and medical director of Biologic Integrative Healthcare and the Biologic Wellness Center in Brattleboro, who specializes in Lifestyle and Functional Medicine. Artistic collaborator: Lindel Hart, performer, yoga instructor, and writer with the music of John Sheldon, guitarist.
8:30 PM EVENING ACTIVITIES: networking at local cafés, informal open-space sessions, dinner options at local restaurants

 

Thursday, June 5

Time

Session

Details

7:45-8:25 AM GATHERING — Latchis Theatre Lobby Registration, continental breakfast 
8:30-10 AM PLENARY 2: Time is running out, let’s slow down  — In a time of grave and urgent crisis, the “slow” movement might seem a little bit frivolous. Don’t we need to sacrifice everything in order to deal with the enormity of the crisis at hand? Or is it that urgency itself is part of the problem? Join Charles for a deep dive into a paradox that unlocks a new defining story of the people — Latchis Main Theatre Charles Eisenstein, speaker and writer; author of The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible, The Ascent of Humanity, Sacred Economics, and The Yoga of Eating. Artistic collaborator: cellist Eugene Friesen, world-renowned for his ground-breaking improvisational work and long-time work with the Paul Winter Consort.
10 – 10:25 AM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby

10:30 AM – NOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS
HEALTH, HEALING AND COMMUNITY (Breakout session related to Wed. evening’s plenary) — Marlboro 2E Samantha Eagle, founder and medical director of Biologic Integrative Healthcare and the Biologic Wellness Center in Brattleboro, who specializes in Lifestyle and Functional Medicine.
TIME IS RUNNING OUT (Breakout session related to Thursday morning’s plenary) — Latchis Main Theatre Charles Eisenstein, speaker and writer, author of The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible, The Ascent of Humanity, Sacred Economics, and The Yoga of Eating.
Artistic followup to the Thursday morning plenaryMarlboro Glassroom Cellist Eugene Friesen, world-renowned for his ground-breaking improvisational work and long-time work with the Paul Winter Consort.
Taking control of our food:  Building a New Food System.  Local schools including UMass, Hampshire and Williams are taking significant steps to support a reinvigorated local food system through local sourcing, the fair food pledge and taking inventories of idle farm land to match with aspiring farmers.   This panel will showcase the successful initiatives taking place at area schools and will inspire all Summit participants with what is already being done and what is possible. — Marlboro 2C Rachel Dutton, Sustainability Manager for UMASS Auxiliary; Isabel HansenBeth Hooker, Director of Food, Farm and Sustainability at Hampshire
College
NOON – 1:35 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, Main Street

Farm-fresh local food — Sponsor exhibit tables open — Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

1:45 – 3:15 PM PLENARY 3: The Free-co-system: Investing for personal and community wealth —How might we more holistically deploy personal and collective “capital”? How do people of varying professions and backgrounds define their core “assets”, identify and engage “markets”, mitigate “risks”, efficiently “leverage” resources for growth and resilience, and ultimately build meaningful “wealth?” Economically-centric in modern parlance, these five words have carried loaded or varying definitions, and their traditionally narrow definitions have limited the manner in which our “investments” can enhance our collective welfare. Through several interesting examples – globally, nationally and locally – this dialogue explores the organic nature of markets and communities. Come discuss how institutions and individuals might consider their “investment” (in civic engagement, energy, and economics) to strengthen our collective resilience and achieve greater “wealth” for ourselves and our communities — Latchis Main Theatre Amit Sharmainvestment professional who has worked at the intersection of commercial enterprise, public policy and the capital markets – with organizations in the public, private and development sectors. Artistic collaborator: Amy Johnquest, aka the Banner Queen, a painter who offers handpainted sideshow banners reminiscent of old carnivals and traveling circuses.
3:15 – 3:40 PM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby

3:45 – 5:15 PM BREAKOUT SESSIONS
The Free-co-system: A Practicum — Breakout session related to the Thursday afternoon plenary, focused on crafting a strategic business model and operational plan for the Strolling of the Heifers’ new Center — Glassroom, Marlboro 1 Amit Sharmainvestment professional who has worked at the intersection of commercial enterprise, public policy and the capital markets – with organizations in the public, private and development sectors. With Orly Munzing, Strolling of the Heifers founder and executive director.
Yoga Mandala: A Yoga Workshop — Mandala means “circle” in Sanskrit, and “yoga” literally translates as “union”. In Jungian psychology a mandala is a symbol representing the effort to reunify the self. Lindel Hart will lead a contemplative yoga practice in which you’ll create a three-dimensional mandala with your body in space, a meditation on the circle of life. Use the creation of a yoga mandala as a tool to reunite the disparate elements of your Self into a cohesive, organic whole. — Marlboro 2E Lindel Hart, owner/director of Hart Yoga in Shelburne Falls, MA, and the yoga instructor at Deerfield Academy.
  Slow Medicine, Local Medicine: Experiential ramble to meet the plants — In this roving session you will explore the nearby landscape to ground and re-tune your vision to the green and breathing world. How can we begin, today, to build intimate relationship with the land? Learning about specific herbs for our ailments is one path to deeper kinship with the green world and all of Nature. Reclaim your right and responsibility to self-care. Experience the plants directly and gain immediately useful knowledge. Exercise your curiosity and wonder-muscles, slowing into plant-time until you gently arrive at Belonging. Meet in front of Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, across from Latchis Theatre Larken Bunce, co-director, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism
FILM: Food for Change: The story of co-operation in America — Food For Change tells the little-known story of the cooperative movement in the United States from the Great Depression to the present. This alternative economic model is presently experiencing a resurgence in response to the 2008 market crash, widening wealth disparity, and the consolidation of the food industry. (See related discussion session, Friday PM) — Latchis Main Theatre Shown with the generous support of the Neighboring Food Co-ops Association and the Brattleboro Food Co-op — film producer Steve Alves will be on hand to answer questions.
The Locavore Index and Measuring the Food System: Much work is underway to strengthen local and regional food systems, with the broad goal of improving economic, environmental and social sustainability. Assessing the impact of this work requires data, and there’s a lot of it out there but synthesizing it can be a challenge. This session will paint a picture of what has changed for the better, and for the worse, in our food system over the past couple of decades — including key findings of the Strolling of the Heifers Locavore Index, the Census of Agriculture and studies by the Economic Research Service; followed by a discussion of changes in the wholesale marketplace for local, regional and sustainably-sourced food. — Marlboro 2B Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension, and Martin Langeveld of Strolling of the Heifers.
Collaborative regional investment and financing: New opportunities for the investor, donor, nonprofit and entrepreneur that focuses on regional resilience and the common good. These panelists discuss their investment and granting models in the evolving world of local lending, financing and granting. Learn how you can use these opportunities to collaborate and grow while supporting your local region. They will be sharing with you their challenges and opportunities as they attempt to work with communities for the common good. — Latchis 4 Janice St. Onge, President, VSJF Flexible Capital Fund, L3C; Cathy Berry, Baldwin Investment Group; Nate Berry, Sandy River Charitable Foundation; Debbie Rooney, Vermont Community Foundation
4:30-6 PM RELATED EVENT: Presentation of Project Atlantic: Project Atlantic is a collaboration between the Brattleboro Town Energy Committee and Brattleboro area students, aiming to educate the public on its future energy options as we head towards 2050, using European nations as a starting point. Students in Mike Auerbach’s Environmental Science and Policy course took on Project Atlantic as their culminating project for the class. They designed an energy-based documentary that will give the public basic information about the latest in renewable energy, energy efficiency, as well as examples of places around the world, the country and Vermont that are putting these progressive energy schemes into practice. At this sessions, the students will present their short films on topics like Biogas, District Heat, Institutional Building Efficiency, Wind and Solar, Geothermal, Agriculture and New Nuclear Technology, woven together by a “News Desk” narrative. Moderated by project advisor Mike Auerbach.  — Marlboro Grad Lounge
5:30 – 7:00 PM

NETWORKING RECEPTION at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden

Heavy hors d’oeuvres; beverages compliments of Crop Organic Vodka and Farmers Organic Gin

7:00 PM FARM ART OPENING RECEPTION: At The Works Bakery Café, Main Street 
EVENING ACTIVITIES: networking at local cafés, informal open-space sessions, dinner options at local restaurants

 

Friday, June 6

Time

Session

Details

7:45-8:25 AM

GATHERING

Registration, continental breakfast in the Latchis Theatre Lobby
8:30 – 10:00 AM PLENARY 4: Soil, Soul, and Society: A love story in three movements —  How can we navigate the paradoxical journey between our sense of urgency and our need to pause and reflect? Can we find balance in the “in-between-ness” of life’s polarities and, perhaps, mine this tension zone for the creative sparks that may reside there? How can we live into and learn from nature and place? How can we cultivate the fertile soil of a rich inner life? How can we foster meaningful relationships in family, work, and community? Based in large part on experiences gained at Hawthorne Valley over 30 years, we will explore these themes through words and music. — Latchis Main Theatre Martin PingExecutive Director of Hawthorne Valley in Ghent, New York, an organization aimed at promoting the integration of society and culture with education and arts. Artistic collaborators: guitarist Seamus Maynard, violinist Jonathan Talbott and cellist Jonah Thomasmembers of the group Quiet in the Head.
10:00 – 10:25 AM

BREAK

Refreshments in Latchis Theatre Lobby

10:30 AM – NOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Soil, Soul, and Society (breakout session related to Friday morning’s plenary) — Latchis 4 Martin PingExecutive Director of Hawthorne Valley in Ghent, New York, an organization aimed at promoting the integration of society and culture with education and arts. With Willow Nilsen and Andrew Avery.
Sell Out or Instill: What Happens to Small Companies’ Social Mission When Acquired by Multinationals? —  When Ben & Jerry’s, New Chapter, and Stonyfield Farm were acquired by huge multinationals (Unilever, Procter & Gamble, and Danone, respectively), what happened to their defining values — their “Social Mission”? It’s easy to assume that large corporations necessarily corrupt the smaller fish they gobble up; it’s harder to conceive the opposite: namely, that the socially responsible DNA of smaller companies gets instilled into the larger firm, metabolizing throughout the enterprise. In this intimate dialogue, leaders of these pioneering companies share detailed stories and effective strategies of how they’ve not only retained their social missions, but spread their values up the corporate food chain. — Marlboro 2C Panelists: Kyle Garner, CEO, New Chapter (a unit of Procter & Gamble); Rob Michalak, Global Director of Social Mission, Ben & Jerry’s (a unit of Unilever); Wood Turner (invited), Vice President, Sustainability Innovation, Stonyfield Farm; Bill Baue (Facilitator), a Corporate Sustainability Architect who teaches in the Marlboro Sustainability MBA program
  The way it is with children — May what I do flow from me like a river, no forcing and no holding back, the way it is with children. (Rilke, The Book of Hours) Linda McInerney and Terry Jenoure offer an invitation to share personal stories and a conversation about processes for excavating and telling them. — Marlboro Glassroom Linda McInerneythe Summit’s artistic director, founder/director of Old Deerfield Productions, with artistic collaborator Terry Jenoure, singer and violinist, poet, multi-media artist and teacher.
  The Slow Transportation Movement and the Emergence of the Cargobike. Drawing on concepts from the fields of sensory and neuropsychology, we’ll investigate our interrelationships with the social and ecological worlds we inhabit and why moving slower in the world is not just a good idea, but a necessity in order to effectively respond to local and global ecological challenges. We then consider the Slow Transportation Movement, a model for engaging our bodies, attuning our senses and slowing down. Finally, we’ll look at the implications of the exciting, new bicycle designs and technologies that are extending bikes and their range, comfort, carrying capacity (kids & cargo), and hill climbing ease. We’ll have some amazing vehicles on hand to see, touch and ride! — Marlboro Graduate Lounge and Patio Dave Cohenpsychotherapist and ecopsychologist
Lessons from a 10-mile diet — If you drew a 10-mile eating circle around your home, what would you eat? What would you miss? What would you learn about yourself and your food system? Vicki Robin, author of Blessing the Hands that Feed Us, did just that. In this workshop you will hear her story and the lessons learned that can help you explore your relationship with food and the hands that feed you. This will be a true workshop with exercises and handouts to anchor the stories, lectures and conversations in your own growing/ shopping/ cooking/ eating/ ethical life. — Latchis Main Theatre Vicki Robin, co-author of the perennial best seller, Your Money or Your Life, and author of the new book, Blessing the Hands that Feed Us
Cultural Capital: The Economics of Slow Art — American cultural anthropologist and author Angeles Arrien writes: When we go to a medicine person or healer because we are feeling disheartened, dispirited or depressed, he or she might ask questions like:

  • When did you stop singing?
  • When did you stop dancing?
  • When did you stop being enchanted by stories?

People need the arts, and artists need people. The Slow Money and Slow Living movements come out of a desire to invest in what really matters. This session will be a discussion of Slow Art and explore the value, profitably and sustainability of the arts and creative expression in our lives, in our communities and beyond. — Marlboro 2E

Erica Wheeler‘sense of place’ artist, singer/songwriter, speaker, educator and conservation advocate, with Lori Hanau, strategy and leadership advisor, human centered designer and facilitator; community builder and faculty member within Marlboro College Graduate School’s MBA program “Managing for Sustainability”; Amy Shapiro, Business Development Director, Franklin County (MA) Community Development Corporation; and Connor Stedman, Executive Director, Vermont Wilderness School
NOON – 1:35 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, Main Street

Farm-fresh local food — Sponsor exhibit tables open — Book table featuring books by Summit authors and CDs by Summit artists, presented by Everyone’s Books of Brattleboro.

1:45-3:00 PM BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Peruvian Healing, Personal Music: A journey into Ayahuasca — Over the course of 20 ayahuasca ceremonies, conducted mostly in the Peruvian Amazon, I experienced a deep shift in my perception of reality. It seemed that, over the protests of my mind, the powerful plant medicine was teaching me to live in my heart.  This caused a fundamental change in my approach to music. In this workshop, I’ll share some stories of the journey, and demonstrate how it changed my creative methods. — Marlboro Glassroom John Sheldon, guitarist, singer, songwriter
No more throwaway people —  Our economy doesn’t value such core activities as home care, community service, social justice activism and skill sharing. Time Banking addresses that crucial unmet need. In this session we present Time Banking as a model of economics that acknowledges the value of all people and the dignity of all work. Our panel will explore the many uses of Time Banks to create a more just society, looking forward and applying these ideas in new and more inter-connected ways that will build our impact. — with no more throwaway people. — Marlboro 2E Edgar Cahn, founder of Time Banking, author of No More Throwaway People; Stephanie Rearick, Director of the Dane County, Wisconsin Time Bank, and Gwen Hallsmith, author, founder of Global Community Initiatives. Moderated by Linda Weil, former Time Bank coordinator
Quiet In the Head — Artistic followup to the Friday morning plenary — Latchis 4 Guitarist Seamus Maynard, violinist Jonathan Talbott and cellist Jonah Thomasmembers of the group Quiet in the Head
Storytelling workshop — How can we live into and learn from nature and place? How can we cultivate the fertile soil of a rich inner life? How can we foster meaningful relationships in family, work, and community?We ask these questions of adults, but people can begin to explore meaningful ways to address these questions early in life if adults are willing to tell them stories. Through stories, we explore and share our humanity. We communicate our beliefs and values. Stories allow us to communicate across generations. In this workshop, we will explore ways of recreating familiar stories to express values and ideas that have meaning and import for current generations. — Marlboro Graduate Lounge Eshu Bumpus, renowned storyteller, an accomplished jazz vocalist and a master at physical characterization
(Re)Defining Corporate Sustainability to Flourish Within Planetary Boundaries — Corporate Sustainability has developed over the past decade or so with the noble goal of reducing negative impacts on people and the planet in ways that still create profits. Unfortunately, reducing negativity is not necessarily enough to achieve sustainability — nor is it a particularly inspiring goal! A new wave of practitioners are pioneering Context-Based Sustainability (CBS), which calls for companies to operate within planetary boundaries while enhancing social foundations in ways that enable companies and society alike to flourish. This dynamic dialogue features perspectives from a corporate CBS innovator, a non-profit that piloted a context-based rating of corporate sustainability performance, and an academic who teaches in an MBA that’s redefining sustainability through a context-based lens. — Marlboro 2C Panelists: Mike Bellamente, Executive Director, Climate Counts; Jed Davis, Sustainability Director, Cabot Creamery Cooperative; Cary Gaunt, Professor, Marlboro Sustainability MBA; Bill Baue (Facilitator), a Corporate Sustainability Architect who teaches in the Marlboro Sustainability MBA program
Food for Change — Co–ops & Food Security — Since the founding of the first successful co-operatives 170 years ago, food co-ops have enabled people to work together to improve access to wholesome food, support local economies and grow community ownership. Come learn more about what food co-ops are doing to make healthy food and co-op membership more available to low income communities. (See related film showing, Thursday PM) — Marlboro 2E Moderator: Bonnie HudspethNeighboring Food Co-Op Association; Panelists: Suzette Snow-Cobb, Franklin Community Co-op; Sabine Rhyne, Brattleboro Food Co-op; Jen Risley, Monadnock Food Co-op, Kristina Israel, Putney Food Co-op.
3:00 – 3:20 PM

BREAK

Regather at the Latchis Main Theatre

3:25-5:30 PM PLENARY 5: Arts, humor, love and story: Finding the creative connection. Linda McInerney shares her process of creative collaboration and one of her projects, The Red Guitar by John Sheldon in which John shares the journey of his life through music.
“The intent is to describe and enact a journey of the spirit, and to encourage others to find their own path and walk it.”  — Latchis Main Theatre
Linda McInerneythe Summit’s artistic director, founder/director of Old Deerfield Productions, with artistic collaborator John Sheldonguitarist, singer, songwriter.
5:30 PM-8:30 PM Gallery Walk and Strolling of the Heifers Street Festival, Main Street & Downtown Brattleboro

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 7:

SUNDAY, JUNE 8:

  • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.: Farmers Breakfast, The Marina Restaurant, Putney Road
  • 8 a.m through the day: Tour de Heifer 15, 30 and 60-mile farm-to-farm, dirt-road cycling rides, beginning and ending at Lilac Ridge Farm, West Brattleboro
  • 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.: Farm Toursself-guided exploration of five unique and varied farms in the region